Scrum Book Available for Pre-Order

I was very excited to learn that my new book, Scrum: Novice to Ninja, is now available for preorder from Amazon, O’Reilly, and SitePoint. I’ve been working on this book for about six months. I was contacted by the publisher after writing several articles about scrum for their readers. It’s probably the longest nonfiction project that I’ve worked on since I wrote my Masters thesis.

Right now the book is in final edits. I’m working on the preface, creating a mini glossary, and watching as the designer comes up with representations of the sketches I created to illustrate different concepts. I love working with a team, and the process has been magically straightforward.

I wrote the book with the target audience in mind of web developers and mobile developers. I thought the title might reflect that, but the publisher’s including it in a series of other books with a similar titling structure. I don’t think that’ll be a problem.

I’m looking forward to hearing what people think of it. I took a few liberties as I wrote, and I would say that it’s probably not your typical nonfiction book on process management for engineering teams. I’ll let you know as soon as it’s off the presses and in my hands.

Fiction and Nonfiction

I’m having a blast working on my new book about scrum for web and mobile development for SitePoint. I decided to take a slightly offbeat approach to the subject, and incorporate a little fiction into the work.

It’s easy to list out the details of how scrum works, and explain abstractly why it’s such a useful system for supporting web and mobile development teams. It’s something else to make the process come alive for the reader. So I decided to dust off my fiction writing skills and give the team in the book a little color.

I’ve created a set of characters derived broadly from the interactions of engineers, product managers, designers, executives, and others I’ve worked with or coached over the years. I’m trying to show how real people work together, what problems they face, and how they can use the tools of scrum to deal with them.

Scope creep? Covered.

Technical debt? Covered.

Insecurity? Covered.

Unrealistic expectations? Covered.

So far the editors seem to like what I’m doing.

By showing realistic situations, fears, challenges, and accomplishments, I’m hoping to make the subject more concrete. I also want to address some of the concerns about scrum that I’ve read from people who may have had strong negative experiences.

I truly believe that scrum, properly applied by people who don’t think that it’s either going to magically give them the team they always dreamed of having, or that it is a management plot to steal an engineer’s freedom, can be powerful and effective.

Don’t read yourself into any of the characters; more than the names have been changed….